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In 2007, Earth Hour wowed the world with an unprecedented ‘lights off’ showing the world  what people can achieve when they stand united for action on climate change. In the years since, the Earth Hour movement has harnessed the power of the crowd to switch off the lights of iconic landmarks around the world and achieve lasting environmental impacts.   Earth Hour 2016 saw the biggest celebration on our planet ever, with 178 participating countries and territories, and over 1.23 million individual actions taken to help #ChangeClimateChange. We can hardly believe it, but next year will be the 10th anniversary of Earth Hour. That means it's going to be bigger and better than ever before.   Save the date for Saturday 25th March 2017!

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Today, about 50 million Burmese, Cambodian and Lao people do not yet have access to reliable electricity in the Greater Mekong  region(Vietnam, Thailand,  Myanmar, Cambodia and Lao PDR), which is dependent on hydro power, gas, and coal mainly. Greater Mekong countries have an opportunity to become leaders in clean, renewable electricity. Renewable energy sources such as sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass, and ocean energy abound and there is an opportunity to leapfrog and embrace the best technologies now.   WWF in cooperation with Intelligent Energy Systems (IES), an Australian consulting company, has elaborated the Power Sector Vision Report showing that a 100% renewable energy future is possible, where a diverse mix of renewable sources can meet nearly all of the region’s electricity demand for all by 2050. The project was made possible with the generous support of the MAVA Foundation and the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA). The Power Sector Vision Report is to be published in May, 2016.

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Earth Hour City Challenge (EHCC) is an WWF-led initiative. EHCC encourages cities in the world to take further action than just turning out lights for Earth Hour. Candidates submit their Carbon Data Inventory together with at least one commitment and one sustainable development action plan for building, transport, energy and food systems. The city selected to represent its respective country is called “National Earth Hour Capital”. The worldwide winner is entitled the “Global Earth Hour Capital”. Earth Hour City Challenge 2016 is participated by 125 cities from 21 countries. In 2016, Hue is Vietnam's first city to join the global City Challenge.   Under the frame of the City Challenge, WWF creates a digital platform - We Love Cities - that allows people across the world to express support for sustainable urban development by voting on the selected Green cities and posting improvement suggestions for these cities. The voting 2016 will last six weeks, starting on 26 April 2016 on www.welovecities.org.

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The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is the largest mammal living on Earth, and these impressive animals can live for up to 80 years. As a result of their remarkable size, mothers are pregnant for up to 22 months with new-born calves weighing in at around 90 kilos.   Big, gentle, social and intelligent, elephants live in herds and have no natural enemies other than people; habitat encroachment for agriculture leads to the degradation of food sources and human-elephant conflict. Along with an increasing demand for ivory, elephant populations continue to face significant threats.   By focusing on forest restoration - home to elephants and other wild animals, WWF has been working closely with government and non-government partners to implement the ‘Wild Asian Elephant Conservation’ project (funded by IIB - the International Investment Bank) in Yok Don National Park, to monitor, evaluate and devise solutions to ensure the protection of wild elephants in Vietnam.

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The Saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) has rarely been seen in nature since its discovery in 1992. Recently in 2013, a camera trap system set up by WWF and the Quang Nam Forest Protection Department captured an image of a saola in the wild after 15 years without a sign of this reclusive species.   Saola are faced with the threats of poaching and habitat degradation. Although not the main target of hunters, they can be trapped accidentally. From 2011 until today, WWF’s forest guard team has found and destroyed over 83,000 snares in the Central Annamites.   As part of the effort to conserve this endemic species, the “Save the saola – brothers from the same motherland” project was officially launched by WWF-Vietnam in July 2016 to help raise awareness and increase the commitment of both public and private sectors to engage in conservation efforts.

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Có bao giờ bạn tự hỏi: Đồ gỗ, giấy, sổ, sách, truyện mà chúng ta dùng có nguồn gốc từ đâu? Và bạn sẽ nghĩ sao nếu nó đến từ: Những lô gỗ lậu nhập khẩu? Gỗ đốn trộm? Những cánh rừng được quản lý bền vững?
Tất nhiên là bạn sẽ vui nếu biết một tờ giấy bạn đang dùng dù nhỏ cũng đến từ rừng được quản lý bền vững. Điều này có nghĩa là: Giữ gìn và bảo vệ được những giá trị môi trường rừng; Giảm được rủi ro thiên tai như sạt lở đất, lũ lụt; Người dân sống xung quanh rừng được hưởng lợi; Người làm việc trong ngành gỗ được đảm bảo về phúc lợi xã hội; Bảo vệ các loài thú hoang dã trong rừng.
Vậy làm sao để nhận ra một sản phẩm gỗ có trách nhiệm? Sản phẩm gỗ có chứng chỉ đều có nhãn dán. Ví dụ FSC là một trong những loại chứng chỉ rừng bền vững được quốc tế công nhận giúp truy xuất nguồn gốc của gỗ, mà bạn có thể dễ dàng nhận ra. Để đạt được chứng chỉ này, người chủ rừng sẽ phải tuân thủ nghiêm ngặt các bộ tiêu chuẩn quản lý rừng bền vững, có tác động tốt tới môi trường và xã hội. Cùng nhau chúng ta có thể tạo ra thị trường cho những sản phẩm gỗ có trách nhiệm, và thúc đẩy ngành gỗ Việt Nam phát triển bền vững. Đừng quên GIEO RỪNG với WWF bạn nhé. Triển lãm mở từ 23/11 đến 26/11/2017 tại Hội chợ đồ gỗ và trang trí nội thất lớn nhất Việt Nam, VIFA Home, nhà thi đấu TDTT Phú thọ số 11 đường Lữ Gia, phường 15, quận 11, thành phố Hồ Chí Minh.
WWF đang chờ đón các bạn! Thông tin thêm về GIEO RỪNG.

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Hue city is known for many things: its history and magnificent temples, the distinctive food and beautiful architecture, and its people and culture. For residents, Hue is evokes a sense of well-deserved pride and for others, it is a place of intrigue and wonder many want to visit from different corners of the country and even other parts of the world. Hue is also known for being an environmentally friendly place, a green city with conscientious people who wish to protect the environment. In line with this, WWF-Vietnam is supporting Hue to achieve a new challenge: becoming the first Wild Meat – Free City in Vietnam.   Biodiversity in Vietnam faces many threats, the most pressing of all being illegal hunting for commercial purposes. Although poaching takes place in the forest and WWF-Vietnam is supporting local authorities to protect natural reserves and the wildlife that lives in it, the reasons driving this poaching are visible in cities like Hue. Consumption of wild meat in city centers, whether purchased in markets or in restaurants, is the reason there is an incentive to hunt and trade animals illegally and is therefore the driver of the loss of biodiversity. Losing wildlife is not only a loss for the environment, but for people as well, and for the cultures that have coexisted with wildlife for centuries. This natural resource is part of Hue’s heritage. To illustrate this, the concept of Phap Lam has been chosen, to show that consuming wildlife will lead to its disappearance, which is a loss for the local culture. Phap Lam art was once lost in Hue and has been revived by a local artist, Do Huu Triet, who worked for years until he discovered how the art could be restored. This art method covers copper with ceramics to create stunning art pieces. Because the inside of each piece is metal, Phap Lam pieces cannot be broken, they are indestructible. This art was chosen because it represents how many of us view the environment, as an endless resource that will always be there, indestructible. We assume forests will be full of wildlife and plants for all of our, our children’s and grandchildren’s lifetimes. But it is not true; the choices we make on what products we eat and what products we use, directly impact the forest and the wildlife that lives within it. We call on you to communicate and spread the message: Huế văn minh, Huế gìn giữ thú rừng. And take on the challenge yourself, to protect wildlife in the forest by rejecting consumption of meat coming from wild animals. Your decisions will help Hue become Vietnam’s first Wild Meat – Free City.

ASIAN ELEPHANTS

Help us protect Vietnam’s wild elephants!

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ASIAN ELEPHANTS

The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is the largest mammal living on Earth, and these impressive animals can live for up to 80 years. As a result of their remarkable size, mothers are pregnant for up to 22 months with new-born calves weighing in at around 90 kilos.

 

Big, gentle, social and intelligent, elephants live in herds and have no natural enemies other than people; habitat encroachment for agriculture leads to the degradation of food sources and human-elephant conflict. Along with an increasing demand for ivory, elephant populations continue to face significant threats.

 

By focusing on forest restoration – home to elephants and other wild animals, WWF has been working closely with government and non-government partners to implement the ‘Wild Asian Elephant Conservation’ project (funded by IIB – the International Investment Bank) in Yok Don National Park, to monitor, evaluate and devise solutions to ensure the protection of wild elephants in Vietnam.

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