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In 2007, Earth Hour wowed the world with an unprecedented ‘lights off’ showing the world  what people can achieve when they stand united for action on climate change. In the years since, the Earth Hour movement has harnessed the power of the crowd to switch off the lights of iconic landmarks around the world and achieve lasting environmental impacts.   Earth Hour 2016 saw the biggest celebration on our planet ever, with 178 participating countries and territories, and over 1.23 million individual actions taken to help #ChangeClimateChange. We can hardly believe it, but next year will be the 10th anniversary of Earth Hour. That means it's going to be bigger and better than ever before.   Save the date for Saturday 25th March 2017!

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Today, about 50 million Burmese, Cambodian and Lao people do not yet have access to reliable electricity in the Greater Mekong  region(Vietnam, Thailand,  Myanmar, Cambodia and Lao PDR), which is dependent on hydro power, gas, and coal mainly. Greater Mekong countries have an opportunity to become leaders in clean, renewable electricity. Renewable energy sources such as sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass, and ocean energy abound and there is an opportunity to leapfrog and embrace the best technologies now.   WWF in cooperation with Intelligent Energy Systems (IES), an Australian consulting company, has elaborated the Power Sector Vision Report showing that a 100% renewable energy future is possible, where a diverse mix of renewable sources can meet nearly all of the region’s electricity demand for all by 2050. The project was made possible with the generous support of the MAVA Foundation and the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA). The Power Sector Vision Report is to be published in May, 2016.

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Earth Hour City Challenge (EHCC) is an WWF-led initiative. EHCC encourages cities in the world to take further action than just turning out lights for Earth Hour. Candidates submit their Carbon Data Inventory together with at least one commitment and one sustainable development action plan for building, transport, energy and food systems. The city selected to represent its respective country is called “National Earth Hour Capital”. The worldwide winner is entitled the “Global Earth Hour Capital”. Earth Hour City Challenge 2016 is participated by 125 cities from 21 countries. In 2016, Hue is Vietnam's first city to join the global City Challenge.   Under the frame of the City Challenge, WWF creates a digital platform - We Love Cities - that allows people across the world to express support for sustainable urban development by voting on the selected Green cities and posting improvement suggestions for these cities. The voting 2016 will last six weeks, starting on 26 April 2016 on www.welovecities.org.

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The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is the largest mammal living on Earth, and these impressive animals can live for up to 80 years. As a result of their remarkable size, mothers are pregnant for up to 22 months with new-born calves weighing in at around 90 kilos.   Big, gentle, social and intelligent, elephants live in herds and have no natural enemies other than people; habitat encroachment for agriculture leads to the degradation of food sources and human-elephant conflict. Along with an increasing demand for ivory, elephant populations continue to face significant threats.   By focusing on forest restoration - home to elephants and other wild animals, WWF has been working closely with government and non-government partners to implement the ‘Wild Asian Elephant Conservation’ project (funded by IIB - the International Investment Bank) in Yok Don National Park, to monitor, evaluate and devise solutions to ensure the protection of wild elephants in Vietnam.

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The Saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) has rarely been seen in nature since its discovery in 1992. Recently in 2013, a camera trap system set up by WWF and the Quang Nam Forest Protection Department captured an image of a saola in the wild after 15 years without a sign of this reclusive species.   Saola are faced with the threats of poaching and habitat degradation. Although not the main target of hunters, they can be trapped accidentally. From 2011 until today, WWF’s forest guard team has found and destroyed over 83,000 snares in the Central Annamites.   As part of the effort to conserve this endemic species, the “Save the saola – brothers from the same motherland” project was officially launched by WWF-Vietnam in July 2016 to help raise awareness and increase the commitment of both public and private sectors to engage in conservation efforts.

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